YIMBY

September 7, 2016

By Vitali Ogorodnikov

Last week, YIMBY reported on the start of construction work for the high-rise expansion of the pre-war building at 24-16 Queens Plaza South in Long Island City. The project, spearheaded by Greystone Development, would boost the existing five-story structure to 22 floors. Today, we bring you the first renderings, made available via the brand new on-site project board. The design by architecture firm Woods Bagot appears to draw inspiration from Art Moderne, an early modern style that complements its pre-war foundation.

YIMBY

September 1, 2016

By Vitali Ogorodnikov

In formerly industrial Long Island City, most new developments start with a blank state. Some projects, such as the Dutch LIC, Factory House, and 42-14 Crescent Street pay homage to the district’s past via design cues. Other developments, such as 29-37 41st Avenue, 23-10 Queens Plaza South and 43-22 Queens Street, incorporate new towers alongside existing pre-war structures. The project at 24-16 Queens Plaza South takes preservation in a slightly different direction. There, Greystone Development reimagines the façade of the five-story, pre-war commercial building as the base for a new residential tower. The 22-story building at the foot of the Queensboro Bridge will be designed by the Midtown-based firm Woods Bagot. The ground level will be anchored by a 3,863-square-foot retail space, with 117 residential units to be stacked above. The existing property sat unused for some time, and construction scaffolds rose around its perimeter earlier this month.

YIMBY

August 18, 2016

By Rebecca Baird-Remba

Prime Rok Real Estate and Greystone Development purchased the eight-story, Beaux-Arts building at 164 West 74th Street for $26.8 million in February from drug and alcohol rehab nonprofit Phoenix House. Now, the two companies are converting the building, between Columbus and Amsterdam avenues in the Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District, into condos.

The front of the building features elaborate crests above the windows and marble, Ionic columns framing the doorway, and the developers plan to restore it and keep it exactly the same. The Landmarks Preservation Commission will have to approve their plan for the front of the building, but they hope to dramatically transform the rear facade, which can be changed without permission from the full commission. PR reps for the development team have sent along an initial sketch of the back of the building, which will be pulled back about 30 feet and reconstructed into a chevron shape.

The design, from architect Barry Rice, is inspired by the turn-of-the-century facade and ornate Upper West Side residential buildings like the Ansonia and the Apthorp. The condo plan doesn’t have approval from the attorney general’s office yet, but the builders hope to carve out 14 apartments, with duplex penthouses on the seventh and eighth floors. Non-penthouse units will likely be priced at under $5 million, according to Jill Preschel at Greystone, but the duplexes will probably be more.